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Growing up in Klamath County by Patty CardKlamath County has been my home my entire life. 65 years of amazing memories and friends. Time spent at the Klamath County Fairgrounds is just a piece of my many memories. 4-H Fairs, shows, junior rodeos, rodeos themselves, Pow Wows, carnivals, demolition derbies, horse races, bull sales, graduations, and just generally hanging with friends in and around the grounds. What instantly pops into my mind when I am asked about the Fairgrounds is a Junior Rodeo in 1966. My stepsister, Leah, had entered our ranch horse Peanuts in a ¼ mile race. Peanuts was fast and beautiful. She was a tall palomino with a black tail and mane. She pranced when she was happy. She loved being first whether it was working cows, leading parades, or just running through the fields. We all knew she would win. Well win she did. All by herself because she had dumped Leah in the starting gate and came in first - sans rider. Peanuts was so proud of herself! Prancing and dancing and mocking those she beat. Leah was fine, just a bruised ego.Although I was never in 4H, I always went and spent the time there supporting old friends and meeting new friends. One memory that sticks out was my friend Jeannie and I going into town with my mom to her work at LaPointe's. Jeannie and I had almost matching black and white print dresses and heels and were feeling quite proud of ourselves. We proceeded to walk from LaPointe's on Main Street to the Fairgrounds, which is about 2.5 miles one way. It was hot that day, but we did it. Then we arrived and wondered what we were thinking wearing heels and dresses, so we walked back to LaPointe's and changed into jeans and walked back to the Fairgrounds. By the time we got there we were hot and sweaty, and that day's events were over, so we walked back to LaPointe's. No Fitbit or step tracking back then, but we would have earned a badge for it.Horse racing at the Fairgrounds also was one of my favorites. Our family and our friends would go and walk through the horses and see which one we liked. It could be based on horse name, color, saddle color, cute jockey, was it wanting petted, or something else we thought of in the moment. We would bet money and see who came out "richest" at the end. Then we would all go to Wong's Café for dinner that night paid by the big winner. Demolition derby time was great. What better way to get rid of an old car and have fun while you were doing it? Many familiar local names participated in the derby. I also remember the first time a female was able to race, and she was "evil" in a demolition derby sense of course. She smashed cars left and right. I wish I could remember her name, but I cannot. She did not end up winning but she took a close second. Carnivals were not for me, but they were for my late husband and our kids and their friends. They conned me into going into the "Round Up" - that is the stand up, pinned against the wall while spinning extremely fast ride. I was NOT enjoying it but everyone else was - but what they were enjoying was my face turning green and me not standing up. When the ride was over, I fell totally to the ground and had to crawl out. They thought it was the best ride ever - I say the worst ride and never again. Another time I took my younger cousin on the Octopus - his first every carnival ride. To start with he was a quiet young man. Well, that was until I started spinning it and he started screaming vulgarities at the top of his lungs. Which of course, made me laugh and spin it more. He said he has never gone on a ride since. Over the years I have met many old friends there and made many new friends who to this day they are some of my most valued friends of my life. Families coming together and sharing friendship and love. We truly need more "fairgrounds" in our world where we can all come together and be one community. ... See MoreSee Less
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This Thursday!! The Klamath Basin Genealogy Society meets the second Thursday of each month from 6-8 p.m. at the Klamath County Library meeting room. Are you still having trouble finding your relatives? Not sure about numeration districts? Some of the sites are a little awkward to navigate so let us help you. Any other questions are always welcome also. The DNA Interest Group (DIG) started again in June at the Klamath County Library. The group (DIG) meets every first Monday of the month at the Klamath County Library from 1:30 - 4:00 p.m. The group focus is to use DNA technology to aid in genealogical research. We use a round table / open discussion type format. Bring your challenges and / or success stories to share with the group. You can also find us on Facebook under the Klamath Basin Genealogy Society page. Questions can be directed to kbgskf@gmail.com or the at Klamath Basin Genealogical Society ... See MoreSee Less
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MEDICARE OR MEDICAID?"Which is which? And What's the difference". These questions continue to be the most asked and the least understood in any discussion of health insurance So let's dive in - one at a time. Medicaid is a federal-state partnership to provide health insurance assistance to the needy. In Oregon, the Oregon Health Plan is funded by Medicaid. This program is administered by the Department of Human Services (DHS). It provides a safety net for low income people who fall below the state established poverty level. There are strict income and asset guidelines. If you're receiving Oregon Health Plan, full coverage will end when you turn 65 or are deemed disabled. However, Medicaid can still be helpful for Medicare recipients with its Medicare Savings Program. What does this mean? - If your income is less than 150% of poverty level, you may qualify for part or all of your Medicare Part B premium to be paid for by the State with Medicaid funding. If your income is actually below poverty level, you may even qualify for Medicaid to act as your secondary insurance, since Medicare covers only 80% of Parts A and B. How much assistance you will get depends on your income and, in some cases, your assets. In this case, recipients are often called "dual eligible" since they qualify for both Medicare and Medicare to cover Part A (hospital) and Part B (medical). Medicaid will also pay for long term care. This includes nursing home care, assisted living, or hiring help into your home to help you with the activities of daily living. It is available if the Medicare recipient has run out of income to pay for these services. Again, there are strict guidelines and for long term care services, DHS may put a lien on your home to help with payment. This lien is applied only with long term care, not health care, as described above. Medicare is a federal health insurance program which is administered by the Social Security Administration. You are eligible for Medicare when your turn 65 or if you are deemed disabled. There are no income limitations. However, you must have paid into the fund through your payroll taxes during your working years. It does not pay for long term care, and as noted above, pays only 80% of Parts A and B. When you become eligible for Medicare through age or disability, you must enroll in Medicare Parts B and D (drugs) or be penalized. (This penalty does not apply if you are adequately covered by private health insurance, such as provided by your employer, etc. ) Part A is free and Part B has a premium - $170 per month this year (2022). Social Security also provides assistance with Part D drug insurance for those low income recipients who qualify. We're here at the Klamath Basin Senior Services Center to help you examine your options. Just give us a call at 541-883-7171 to make an appointment with a trained and certified volunteer counselor. The service is free.Anne Hartnett,SHIBA Coordinator(Image is a series of question marks with a blurred person pointing to them. Image by Tiko on Adobe Stock Photos) ... See MoreSee Less
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Be Prepared for Extreme HeatKlamath County Public Health update: Heat-related deaths and illness are preventable, but every year many people have health problems related to extreme heat. Below is some information to be prepared for the hot weather in the coming weeks. Who is at greatest risk for heat-related illness?Those at greatest risk for heat-related illness include young children; adults 65 and older; athletes; and people with chronic illness or who are overweight, work outdoors, or have a low income. What things affect the way the body deals with heat?Several things affect the body's ability to cool itself during extremely hot weather. When humidity is high, sweat won't evaporate as quickly, preventing the body from releasing heat quickly. Medications and health conditions may also affect your body's ability to regulate heat. Are there certain health conditions that can increase my risk of heat-related illness?Chronic illnesses such as heart or kidney disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, cancer, alcohol or substance abuse and mental illness can increase risk. Conditions that affect a person's ability to sweat - such as heart disease, cystic fibrosis, Parkinson's disease and quadriplegia - also increase risk. People with mobility and cognitive impairments are at increased risk of heat-related illnesses. Social factors can also contribute to risk. People who are socially isolated or have a low income may be at higher risk, too. Can medications increase the risk of heat-related illness?The risk for heat-related illness and death may increase among people using certain drugs. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist about the medications you take to learn more about their effects during periods of extreme heat, particularly if you know your medication:" Decreases sweating" Increases your body's ability to produce heat" Decreases thirst" Dehydrates the body" Creates hypo-tensionHow can people protect their health when temperatures soar?Remember to stay cool, stay hydrated and stay informed. Wear light colored clothing and use sunscreen. Schedule outdoor activities during cooler times of the day - like in the morning or evening. Drink plenty of fluids. Avoid alcoholic and sugary drinks. Stay informed of the weather and watch the Heat Index to help you identify the most dangerous periods during the heat wave. How can I keep my home cool?If you have an air conditioner, make sure it is installed and working. Set air conditioners to the setting most comfortable to you, preferably between 72°F and 79°F. Block the sun by using awnings or closing curtains and blinds during the day. Avoid using a fan as your main cooling source - especially when it is 90°F or more. What can I do if it is too hot at home?Visit a place that has air conditioning, such as a library or community center. How effective are electric fans in preventing heat-related illness?Electric fans may provide comfort, but when the temperature is in the high 90s or above, fans will not prevent heat-related illness. Taking a cool shower or bath or moving to an air-conditioned place is a much better way to cool off. Air conditioning gives strong protection against heat-related illness. Exposure to air conditioning for even a few hours a day will reduce the risk. How much should I drink during hot weather?During hot weather you will need to drink more liquid, even when you're not thirsty. Increase your fluid intake, regardless of your activity level. During heavy exercise when it's hot, drink two to four glasses (16-32 ounces) of cool fluids each hour. Avoid drinks containing alcohol or caffeine. They can cause you to lose more fluid. What is the best clothing for hot weather or a heat wave?Wear lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing. A wide brimmed hat will provide shade and keep the head cool. When outdoors, be sure to apply sunscreen 20 minutes prior to going out and continue to reapply according to the package directions. Sunburn affects your body's ability to cool itself and causes a loss of body fluids. What is heat stroke?Heat stroke is the most serious heat-related illness. It occurs when the body becomes unable to control its temperature: the body's temperature rises rapidly, sweating stops, and the body can't cool down. Heat stroke can cause death or permanent disability if emergency treatment is not provided. What are the warning signs of a heat stroke?" Very high body temperature (104°F or more)" Red, hot skin" Rapid and strong pulse" Possible unconsciousnessWhat should I do if I see someone with any of the warning signs of heat stroke?If you see any of these signs, it could be a life-threatening emergency. Call 911 and then begin first aid for heat stroke. Do the following:" Move the person to a cooler place, such as a shady or air-conditioned space." Reduce the person's body temperature by using cool cloths, a garden hose or even a cool shower." Do NOT give fluids. Fluids may enter the lungs and cause other problems." Monitor body temperature and continue cooling efforts until the body temperature drops to 101-102°F.If emergency medical personnel are delayed, call the hospital emergency room for more instructions. What should I do if I am working during the heat?Pace yourself. If you are not used to working or exercising in a hot environment, start slowly and pick up the pace gradually. Drink fluids early and often. If it's sunny, use sunscreen. If you're getting overheated, confused or lightheaded, STOP all activity. Get into a cool area or at least in the shade, and rest. The Klamath Senior Center is an Extreme Heat Cooling Center. If you need a respite from the heat or smoke, please come to us. ... See MoreSee Less
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AUGUST 2022 Events at Lake County Senior Citizens Association Starting on Friday, July 29th, the Lakeview Senior Center team wore their favorite tee shirts for luncheon every other Friday. The next Friday we will do a show and tell luncheon. We will rotate through September. Anyone can join us, so please do.We request a 24 hour notice for transportation to ride the LUNCH BUS to the center for meals on Monday, Wednesday and Fridays @ 12:00. 541-947-4966-x106.Home delivered meals are provided weekly. Congregate Meals are being served on Mondays , Wednesdays and Fridays in the dining room @ 12:00 - 1:00. Trips All Rides Require Reservations.Lakeview Local operates 8-5 on Thursdays of the month. The service is FREE, so call to schedule a ride. We require 24 hours advance notice.First & third Tuesday, Klamath Falls Trips for Medical Appointments between 10:00 & 1:00.Second Tuesday Klamath Falls Shopping Trip. Free weekly shopping trips from Christmas Valley to La Pine onWednesdays. Will Meet At The C.V. Community Center.Tuesdays & Thursdays stop in for a puzzle swap. (Bring some to trade/share and take something new for you!) Outback Thrift Shop days are on Mondays & Wednesdays 10:00 - 2:00 so our shoppers can join us for lunch. Donations accepted during store hours. Watch for updates to our basement space & new classes to follow.It takes both the Sun and the rain to make a rainbow. ... See MoreSee Less
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