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Think BIG! - How to fight Parkinson’s Disease with LSVT BIGBy Audra Lewis, PT, DPT, LSVT BIG® Certified ClinicianParkinson’s Disease (PD) is defined as a progressive disorder of the nervous system, and characterized by uncontrollable movements, resting tremor, muscular rigidity, and slow/small movements. Physical therapy can be an important tool in addressing these impairments and increasing an individuals safety when navigating their home or community environment. An emerging method of treatment, known as LSVT Big®, instructed by certified physical or occupational therapists, has shown to improve motor performance and functional mobility in individuals with PD. LSVT Big® is built upon foundational principals of increasing amplitude of movements (emphasizing “Big” movements), performing movements with increased intensity or high effort, and promoting re-calibration. Individuals with PD often do not realize how small their movements have become. Targeting re-calibration allows that participant to develop their own internal cues, and encourages them to independently identify the amount of effort needed to consistently produce bigger, more normal amplitude movements. LSVT Big® begins with 10 maximal daily exercises emphasizing large, high intensity movements. These specific exercises can also be modified to be performed in seated position for individuals who may be wheelchair-bound or who have difficulty maintaining balance. These exercises increase in complexity as the individual moves through the LSVT Big® program. Participants are then provided with a more individualized program, including functional component tasks, or everyday (one-step) tasks that are challenging to the participant, including getting out of a chair or pulling keys out of a coat pocket. This is followed by performing hierarchy tasks, or more complex tasks that require multiple steps, including getting out of bed or putting on a jacket. All of this task-specific training encompasses the foundational components of LSVT Big®, targeting big effort, large movements, and re-calibration of internal cues. LSVT Big® is delivered over 4 consecutive weeks, with 4 60-minute sessions each week. Through consistent adherence to LSVT Big® and guidance by a certified therapist, there has shown to be improved postural control, reduced risk for future falls, and improved walking patterns in individuals with Parkinson’s Disease. If you have Parkinson’s Disease and are interested in pursuing physical therapy treatment including LSVT Big, contact your primary care provide and request a referral to LSVT Big certified therapist, Audra Lewis at Sky Lakes Medical Center.[Image description: A clinician is raising her left arm high and stretching right arm back behind her as an older gentleman is mirroring her movement. Image credit: Community Sports and Therapy Center, Ohio] ... See MoreSee Less
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In Loving Memory Neal Baldwin1932 ~ 2022Neal Ronald Baldwin was born March 25, 1932 in Sioux Falls Wisconsin to Lester and Ada Baldwin; and gained his wings on December 13, 2022 in Klamath Falls, Oregon. He was 90 years old. He died peacefully, surrounded by family.After retiring with 20 years of service in the Navy, he returned to college to get his BA in accounting. He then worked for another 15 years in Civil Service in California. He moved to Klamath Falls in 1992 where he became a private accountant. After many years of accounting, he decided to join the staff at Klamath Senior Center as the Fiscal Manager.In 1951 he met the love of his life, Thelma “T.J.” Jane Miller whom he married 1 year later. During their 70 years of marriage, they had 3 children: sons Donald Lee Baldwin (Kathy), Ronald Mark Baldwin (Monica), and daughter Linda Breeden (John).Neal had many passions in his life: a dedicated bowler, square dancing king, card games with family and friends, camping, and baseball (go Mariner’s) He also belonged to many organizations such as Grange, Klamath Basin Senior Center, IOOF, and the Sky Lakes Volunteer Guild. He always believed in giving back.Neal was preceded in death by his parents Lester and Ada; his son Donald Baldwin; all his brothers; and one sister. He is survived by his wife Thelma; son and daughter-in-law Mark & Monica; daughter and son-in-law Linda & John, 8 grandchildren; 26 great grandchildren, and four great-great grandchildren.Remembering Neal Baldwin, A Man of Wise DecisionsI met Neal in March of 2004 when I was hired to be his financial assistant.I was told that the decision to hire was between myself and a young college graduate with long legs who came into the Interview with a short skirt. Neal being a leg man seemed to favor the college graduate until talking to my former employer. In the end my experience in accounting got me the job, definitely not my “long” legs. I’m only 4’11”.Neal had a background of being an auditor so he was very particular in how things were done. If I was off a penny, I had to find it. It was always fun to come to work and see what Hawaiian shirt he was wearing and he liked to see if you noticed when he was wearing a new one. One memory I have of Neal is that he loved Catalina dressing on his salads. He would put it on everything, and I do mean everything including sauerkraut. He treated me as family and I always knew if I ever needed anything, even after he no longer was my boss that I could ask for his help. Neal was very dedicated to the work he did for the Senior Center and was proud of the many grants he was able to get to keep the funding going. Even after he left, he continued to volunteer with the bingo fundraiser along with other members of his family.Submitted by Shawn McGahanFinancial Services ManagerKlamath Basin Senior Citizens’ Center, Inc. ... See MoreSee Less
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Looking for an opportunity to volunteer or serve in a larger role as a board member in the community? Consider the Klamath Outdoor Science School. ... See MoreSee Less
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Knock Out Parkinson’s Disease - The Rock Steady Boxing SolutionBy Anne Davenport, PT, DPTEvidence suggests that rigorous exercise, emphasizing gross motor movement, balance, core strength, and rhythm, could favorably impact range of motion, flexibility, posture, gait, and activities of daily living – especially in individuals with Parkinson’s Disease (PD). More recent studies, most notably at Cleveland Clinic, University of Indianapolis, and Butler University, have begun to suggest that certain kinds of rigorous exercise, such as boxing, may be neuro-protective, i.e., actually slowing disease progression. Exercises are largely adapted from boxing drills, which condition an individual with PD for optimal agility, speed, muscular endurance, accuracy, hand-eye coordination, footwork and overall strength. Rock Steady Boxing was founded in 2006 by former Marion County (Indiana) Prosecutor, Scott C. Newman, who is living with Parkinson’s and his friend, Vince Perez, an experienced boxer, who “refused to let his friend go down without a fight.” Rock Steady Boxing created classes to meet the fitness levels at all stages of PD - from the newly diagnosed to those who had been living with it for decades plus. Participants find that engaging in weekly classes allows them to maintain and improve their freedom of movement, feelings of being relevant and active, and the joy derived from life and from truly caring friendships.Currently, there are no classes in Klamath Falls, however, there are weekly classes at Parkinson Central Ashland, 905 Skylark Place, Ashland, OR 97520, 541-326-1190; and at Higs Gym, 2744 Taylor Road, Central Point, OR 97502. 541-665-5860.If you are interested in learning more about how to become a Rock Steady Boxing Affiliate or facilitating bringing Rock Steady Boxing to Klamath Falls, please contact Anne Davenport at 541-883-7171 ext. 122 or stayactive@kbscc.org. References: rocksteadyboxing.org/[Image description: An older woman in a black t-shirt is wearing red boxing gloves, punching at a boxing bag hanging from the ceiling. She looks determined and strong. Image credit: Genesis Health] ... See MoreSee Less
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Let’s Talk About PDby Ginnie ReedAfter interviewing 4 different individuals with Parkinson’s Disease I can say for certain that it effects everyone differently. Different times in life, symptoms, progression, gender and genetics. Lisa was diagnosed six years ago at the age of 51. She is active daily and walks, takes group exercise classes 3 times a week, rides a bike and works with aerobic weights. She sees a naturopathic specialist who has recommended a natural dopamine and sticks to a Mediterranean diet, no processed foods. When she noticed that the fingers on her left hand weren’t working properly, dexterity was failing, she went to her doctor. She was also aware that her sense of smell was weakening. Lisa took an aggressive approach and has kept a positive attitude. She firmly believes that exercise and diet are key in helping her maintain a healthy lifestyle.Ron, whose wife had suffered from Parkinson’s, cared for her and watched the disease first hand. He is now part of the local Parkinson’s Disease Support Group that meets the 3rd Tuesday of every month at the Red Rooster Grill and Pub, 3608 S. 6th St. The luncheon begins at noon and the support meeting begins at 1pm. All are invited. You are encouraged to ask Ron questions, he is a great resource.Karon is 70 years old and was diagnosed 5 years ago. She is living in a care community now. Her grandkids come to visit so she gets to stay active in their lives, she love to chat and be social but there are some speech difficulties. Karon uses a walker, rides a stationary bike and exercises everyday. She attends the Senior Center Qi Gong classes and uses the bus. She says, “I keep moving so I can keep moving.”Chuck realized at 94 he might have a medical issue. He was salivating and shaking a lot. He thought it might be just part of the aging process, but he went to his doctor just to make sure. That was 3 years ago. Today, at 97, he is still going strong. He has been extremely active his entire life. He lived in Libya working for Mobile Oil, taught electrical school, was in the Coast Guard, got his degree from Berkley, served for the environmental services in Chiloquin and is an active member in the Unity Fellowship. PD has slowed him down a bit but he’s not giving in. ... See MoreSee Less
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